Ureolytic bacteria from electronic waste area, their biological robustness against potentially toxic elements and underlying mechanisms

Weila Li, Ayelet Fishman, Varenyam Achal*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Ureolytic bacteria can be a promising mediator used for the immobilization of potentially toxic elements via microbially-induced carbonate precipitation (MICP) process from biodegradable ions to carbonate form. Electronic waste (E-waste) environment is very complex compared to general metal contaminated soil, however, MICP has not been studied under such an environment. In this study, three bacterial strains were successfully isolated from an E-waste area in Guiyu, China, and indicated to have positive ureolytic behavior with significant heavy metal resistance (specific to Cu and Pb), among which, a strain of Lysinibacillus sp. was proven to show a great persistence in heavy metal immobilization. This featured strain can tolerate up to 100 ppm copper and 1000 ppm lead according to minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) results, and its urease activity was well-adapted to metal effects. Results also revealed the positive correlation (R2 = 0.9819) between metal concentrations and surface layer protein content present in bacterial cells. The underlying mechanism on the role of S-layer protein in heavy metal immobilization during biocalcification was elucidated. The metabolic system of heavy metal resistance for these E-waste derived isolates is novel and represents a point of interest for possible environmental applications to immobilize toxic heavy metals from electronic waste sites.

Original languageEnglish
Article number112517
JournalJournal of Environmental Management
Volume289
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jul 2021

Keywords

  • Bioremediation
  • Lysinibacillus sp
  • Microbial carbonate
  • S-layer protein
  • Urease

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