Salmonella induces the formation of filamentous structures containing lysosomal membrane glycoproteins in epithelial cells

F. Garcia-del Portillo, M. B. Zwick, Yin Leung Ka Yin Leung, B. B. Finlay*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

234 Scopus citations

Abstract

Salmonella species invade and replicate within epithelial cells in membrane-bound vacuoles. In this report we show that upon infection of HeLa epithelial cells, Salmonella typhimurium resides in vacuoles that contain lysosomal membrane glycoproteins (Igps). Four to six hours after invasion, intracellular bacteria induce the formation of stable filamentous structures containing Igps that are connected to the bacteria-containing vacuoles. Formation of these Igp-rich structures requires viable intracellular bacteria and is blocked by inhibitors of vacuolar acidification. These structures are not present in uninfected cells or in cells infected with another invasive bacteria, Yersinia enterocolitica. Tracers added to the extracellular medium are not delivered to the Salmonella-induced filaments, suggesting that these structures are different from previously described tubular lysosomes. Initiation of intracellular bacterial replication correlates with formation of these Igp-containing filaments. Certain avirulent Salmonella mutants that are defective for intracellular replication fail to induce formation of these structures. These observations suggest that Salmonella-induced filaments containing Igps are linked to intracellular bacterial replication.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)10544-10548
Number of pages5
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume90
Issue number22
DOIs
StatePublished - 1993
Externally publishedYes

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