Influence of mangrove roots on microbial abundance and ecoenzyme activity in sediments of a subtropical coastal mangrove ecosystem

Ling Luo*, Ruonan Wu, Ji Dong Gu, Jing Zhang, Shihuai Deng, Yanzong Zhang, Lilin Wang, Yan He

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Although the rhizosphere effect has been widely studied, the relevant information about how mangrove roots affect microbial and enzymatic activity was still lacking due to the particularity of mangroves and intertidal zone. In order to understand the effects of mangrove roots on microbial growth and the indicators of nutrient cycling, microbial abundance as well as extracellular enzyme activities were investigated in both rhizosphere and non-rhizosphere sediments of a coastal mangrove wetland ecosystem. Comparing to non-rhizosphere sediments, bacterial abundance was slightly lower, but fungal abundance was notably higher in the rhizosphere sediments. Moreover, β-glucosidase (GLU), N-acetyl-glucosaminidase (NAG) and acid phosphatase (ACP) activities were enhanced clearly, whereas phenol oxidase (PHO) activity was significantly reduced in the rhizosphere sediments. Interestingly, it was found that soluble phenolics were closely related to fungal abundance and PHO activity (p < 0.05). Both fungal abundance and PHO activity were also significantly correlated with each other (p < 0.05). Therefore, the strong correlation between fungal abundance and both phenolics and PHO activity might partially suggest that fungi might contribute to the reduction of soluble phenolics.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)10-17
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Biodeterioration and Biodegradation
Volume132
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Enzymatic stoichiometry
  • Hydrolase
  • Phenol oxidase
  • Rhizosphere
  • Soluble phenolics

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