An in-depth survey of the oil spill literature since 1968: Long term trends and changes since Deepwater Horizon

David Murphy*, Brad Gemmell, Liana Vaccari, Cheng Li, Hernando Bacosa, Meredith Evans, Colbi Gemmell, Tracy Harvey, Maryam Jalali, Tagbo H.R. Niepa

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

42 Scopus citations

Abstract

In order to characterize the state of oil spill research and describe how the field has changed since its inception in the 1960s and since the Deepwater Horizon spill in 2010, we examined approximately 10% of oil spill literature (1255 of over 11,000 publications) published from 1968 to 2015. We find that, despite its episodic nature, oil spill research is a rapidly expanding field with a growth rate faster than that of science as a whole. There is a massive post-Deepwater Horizon shift of research attention to the Gulf of Mexico, from 2% of studies in 2004–2008 to 61% in 2014–2015, thus ranking Deepwater Horizon as the most studied oil spill. There is, however, a longstanding gap in research in that only 1% of studies deal with the effects of oil spills on human health. These results provide a better understanding of the current trends and gaps within the field.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)371-379
Number of pages9
JournalMarine Pollution Bulletin
Volume113
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - 15 Dec 2016
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Deepwater Horizon
  • Dispersant
  • Exxon Valdez
  • Literature review
  • Oil spill
  • Public health

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