The Contribution Of High-Energy X-rays and Neutrons to Characterization and Development of Intermetallic Titanium Aluminides

Thomas Schmoelzer*, Klaus Dieter Liss, Peter Staron, Andreas Stark, Emanuel Schwaighofer, Thomas Lippmann, Helmut Clemens, Svea Mayer

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

Abstract

Diffraction methods using neutrons and/or high-energy X-rays offer unique opportunities for investigating various aspects of importance for the development of intermetallic titanium aluminides (TiAl) alloys. Despite their different nature, high-energy X-rays and neutrons are both suited for performing diffraction as well as scattering experiments in materials science. A common feature of structural materials, including TiAl alloys, is the dependency of their properties on phase composition and the arrangement of the constituting phases. Employing high-energy X-ray diffraction (HEXRD) allowed for in situ monitoring of the phases evolution. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a method that would allow determining phase fractions in lamellar grains, although at the expense of time-consuming sample preparation and the restriction to small sample volumes. By diffraction methods, the phase fractions can be determined with high accuracy even in the instance that lamellar colonies are present in the material.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationNeutrons and Synchrotron Radiation in Engineering Materials Science
Subtitle of host publicationFrom Fundamentals to Applications: Second Edition
Publisherwiley
Pages395-424
Number of pages30
ISBN (Electronic)9783527684489
ISBN (Print)9783527335923
DOIs
StatePublished - 27 Jan 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • High-energy x-ray diffraction
  • In situ deformation experiments
  • Intermetallic titanium aluminides alloys
  • Materials science
  • Phase fractions
  • Transmission electron microscopy

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