Surface charge and metal ion adsorption on an H-type activated carbon: Experimental observation and modeling simulation by the surface complex formation approach

J. P. Chen*, M. Lin

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

89 Scopus citations

Abstract

Experimental and modeling studies on both surface charge and adsorption of metals on an H-type activated carbon were conducted. The surface charge density decreased with an increase in pH and a decrease in ionic strength. Higher copper adsorption percentage was achieved with higher pH and ionic strength and lower initial concentration. The metal uptake was in the descending order of Cu2+>Zn2+≈Co2+. Zinc and cobalt did not affect the copper removal; however, adsorption of both reduced in the presence of copper. The two-pK triple layer surface complex formation model successfully elucidated the surface charge density and metal adsorption in various conditions (pH, ionic strength, anions, single- and multiple-metal ions, and initial concentration). Modeling revealed that the copper removal was due to adsorption of Cu2+, CuOH+ and CuCl+ on the activated carbon. Zinc and cobalt uptake resulted from the formation of the surface-metal complexes (SO-M2+ and SO-MOH+, M=Zn, Co). Based on the parameters from the modeling of surface charge density and single-metal-ion removal (i.e. Cu, Zn and Co), modeling multiple-metal-ion adsorption (Cu-Zn, Cu-Co and Cu-Zn-Co) was performed. It was demonstrated that the model described well the competitive effects on the metal adsorption. Finally, sensitivity analysis of model parameters was conducted.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1491-1504
Number of pages14
JournalCarbon
Volume39
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • A. Activated carbon
  • C. Adsorption
  • D. Surface properties
  • Modeling

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