Microwave irradiation differentially affect the physicochemical properties of waxy and non-waxy hull-less barley starch

Mengting Ma, Yu Zhang, Xiaojing Chen, Haitao Li, Zhongquan Sui*, Harold Corke

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Waxy and non-waxy hull-less barley kernels and their isolated starches were irradiated under different microwave conditions (power 640, 720, and 800 W, time 60, 120 and 180 s). Changes in physicochemical properties were studied to investigate the effects of microwave irradiation (MWI) on in-kernel starches and isolated starches. For in-kernel starch, microwave reduced the ratio of 1047/1022 cm−1 wavelengths, gelatinization enthalpy (ΔHg) and relative crystallinity (RC), indicating that microwave of starch within the cells disrupted the crystalline regions. For isolated starch, microwave decreased the ratio of 1047/1022 cm−1 wavelengths but increased ΔHg of isolated starch, indicating that microwaving resulted in disruption of amorphous structure and an increase in the amount of remaining double helix structure. Moreover, viscosities of in-kernel starches decreased as microwave power and time increased, but this was not observed in isolated starches. Microwave treatment induced an enhancement of gelatinization temperature for non-waxy starches (NWS) but decreased in waxy starches (WS). Microwave had a greater effect for swelling power and solubility on in-kernel MWI-WS than MWI-WS, whereas the reverse results were found between in-kernel MWI-NWS and MWI-NWS. The results indicated that amylose plays a profound role in the properties of isolated and in-kernel starches during microwaving.

Original languageEnglish
Article number103072
JournalJournal of Cereal Science
Volume95
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2020

Keywords

  • Gelatinization
  • Hull-less barley starch
  • Microwave
  • Viscosity

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