Lower Abundance of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea Than Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacteria Detected in the Subsurface Sediments of the Northern South China Sea

Huiluo Cao, Yiguo Hong, Meng Li, Ji Dong Gu*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

Diversity and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB) in samples of the northern South China Sea subsurface sediment were assessed by analyzing the amoA gene sequences retrieved from the samples. The microbial diversity was assessed using rarefaction and phylogenetic analyses. The deep-sea subsurface sediments harbored diverse and distinct AOA and AOB communities, but the abundance of AOA was lower than that of AOB, consistent with many other studies about bacteria and archaea in subsurface sediments. Diversity of AOA shown in the OTUs and Shannon index was correlated with the concentration of nitrite in the Pearson analysis, but no obvious relationships between the diversity or abundance of AOB and the physicochemical parameters could be identified in the present study, indicating the concentration of ammonium may not be an important factor to determine the diversity and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing prokaryotes in the subsurface sediments. Additionally, Nitrosomonas-like AOB was found to be dominant in subsurface sediments of the northern South China Sea showing a different adaption strategy comparing with some Nitrosospira-like AOB lineages. Concentration of nitrite was correlated with diversity of AOA, but no correlations between diversity and abundance of AOB and the physicochemical parameters were established in the study. Supplementary materials are available for this article. Go to the publisher's online edition of Geomicrobiology Journal to view the free supplemental files.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)332-339
Number of pages8
JournalGeomicrobiology Journal
Volume29
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2012
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • ammonia-oxidizing archaea
  • ammonia-oxidizing bacterial
  • amoA
  • South China Sea
  • subsurface

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