Highly efficient removal of phosphorus from agricultural runoff by a new akadama clay barrier-vegetated drainage ditch system (VDD) and its mechanism

Yan He, Xueqiu Zhou, Qiongyue Zhang, Ji Dong Gu, Yanzong Zhang, Yan Liu, Lilin Wang, Yinlong Xiao, Fei Shen, Shihai Deng, Shirong Zhang, Ling Luo*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

A vegetated drainage ditch (VDD) system is an effective management practice for removing excess phosphorus (P) from agricultural runoff. However, the maximization of P removing efficiency by VDD remains a challenge. In this study, new VDDs with akadama clay barriers (particle size of clay: 1–6 mm; height of barrier: 5–15 cm and length of barrier: 10–90 cm) were designed in lab scale, and the mechanism of phosphate removal by akadama clay was investigated. It was found that a new VDD with akadama clay barriers (particle size:1 mm; height:10 cm and length: 90 cm) exhibited the highest removal efficiency of total P (TP) (97.1%), particulate P(PP) (96.9%), and dissolved P (DP) (97.4%), respectively. The retained P was mainly adsorbed in akadama clay barrier sections, and a low concentration of P was observed in soil sections in the new VDD. The maximum adsorption capacity of phosphate to akadama clay was 5.06 mg/g at 298 K, and XPS analysis indicated that phosphate was adsorbed by the inner-sphere complexation formation with the metal elements (Al, Fe). This study indicates that the new VDD with akadama clay barriers is a promising technique to efficiently remove P from agricultural runoff and significantly minimize the risk of P release into streams through runoff.

Original languageEnglish
Article number112575
JournalJournal of Environmental Management
Volume290
DOIs
StatePublished - 15 Jul 2021

Keywords

  • Adsorption of phosphorus
  • Akadama clay barrier
  • Phosphorus removal efficiency
  • Vegetated drainage ditch

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