Effects of Short-Term Biosolarization Using Mature Compost and Industrial Tomato Waste Amendments on the Generation and Persistence of Biocidal Soil Conditions and Subsequent Tomato Growth

Yigal Achmon*, Nir Sade, María Del Mar Rubio Wilhelmi, Jesus D. Fernández-Bayo, Duff R. Harrold, James J. Stapleton, Jean S. Vandergheynst, Eduardo Blumwald, Christopher W. Simmons

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Conventional solarization and biosolarization with mature compost and tomato processing residue amendments were compared with respect to generation of pesticidal conditions and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) plant growth in treated soils. Soil oxygen depletion was examined as a response that has previously not been measured across multiple depths during biosolarization. For biosolarized soil, volatile fatty acids were found to accumulate concurrent with oxygen depletion, and the magnitude of these changes varied by soil depth. Two consecutive years of experimentation showed varying dissipation of volatile fatty acids from biosolarized soils post-treatment. When residual volatile fatty acids were detected in the biosolarized soil, fruit yield did not significantly differ from plants grown in solarized soil. However, when there was no residual volatile fatty acids in the soil at the time of planting, plants grown in biosolarized soil showed a significantly greater vegetation amount, fruit quantity, and fruit ripening than those of plants grown in solarized soil.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5451-5461
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
Volume66
Issue number22
DOIs
StatePublished - 6 Jun 2018

Keywords

  • food waste valorization
  • fumigation alternative
  • integrated pest management
  • soil oxygen content
  • tomato plant physiology
  • tomato waste

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