Distribution and sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in sediments of the Mai Po Inner Deep Bay Ramsar Site in Hong Kong

Zhen Ye Zhao, Yan Ling Chu, Ji Dong Gu*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

37 Scopus citations

Abstract

The concentration of total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (∑PAHs) and the 16 US EPA priority individual PAH compounds were analyzed in surface sediments from the Mai Po Inner Deep Bay, Ramsar Site of Hong Kong from December 2001 to Jun 2005, to investigate the spatial variability of anthropogenic pollutants. ∑PAHs concentrations ranged from 36.5 to 256.3 ng g-1 dry weight with an average of 148.9 ng g-1, comparable to other urbanized areas of the world, and there was little difference among different sampling times from December 2001 to June 2005. Based on comparison to the results from earlier study, it appears that a decrease of total PAHs concentration has occurred since 1992. Meanwhile, the concentrations of ∑PAHs were positive correlated with total organic carbon contents except sites F and G, suggesting the characteristics of the sediment influences the distribution and concentration of PAHs. There was relatively a good relationship among the individual PAHs and the compounds of fluorene, phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene, pyrene, benzo[a]pyrene and indeno[cd]pyrene yielded a good correlation (r2>0.5) with total PAHs. Principal component analysis and specific PAHs compound ratios (Phe/Ant vs. Flt/Pyr) indicate the pyrogenic origins, especially traffic exhausts, are the dominant sources of PAHs in the Mai Po Inner Deep Bay Nature Reserve.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1743-1752
Number of pages10
JournalEcotoxicology
Volume21
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2012
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Anthropogenic
  • Mai Po Ramsar Site
  • PAH
  • Sediments
  • Urbanization

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