Can a gradient crystal compete with a mosaic crystal as a monochromator in neutron- or X-ray diffraction?

K. D. Liss*, A. Magerl

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

First a description of the Bragg reflection in polar coordinates is developed. Subsequently this formalism is applied to describe diffraction for mosaic crystals, gradient crystals and to include the Doppler effect on moving crystals. Within this framework the performance of a powder diffractometer as a two crystal configuration is evaluated. A traditional mosaic monochromator seems to be well suited when large values of reciprocal lattice vectors G are of main interest. However, a gradient crystal monochromator becomes competitive for G2 G1 < 0.5 with G2 and G1 representing the reciprocal lattice vectors of the sample and the monochromator, respectively. This holds in particular for a reflectometer, where the scientific interest focuses at small G2 values. It is argued that particularly performant designs can be expected on a reflectometer for a monochromator which combines a reflection on a gradient crystal with a suitably chosen Doppler effect.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)90-98
Number of pages9
JournalNuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research, Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment
Volume338
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 8 Jan 1994
Externally publishedYes

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