Azo dye degrading bacteria tolerant to extreme conditions inhabit nearshore ecosystems: Optimization and degradation pathways

Mei Zhuang, Edmond Sanganyado, Xinxin Zhang, Liang Xu, Jianming Zhu, Wenhua Liu*, Haihong Song

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

Nearshore ecosystems are transitional zones, and they may harbor a diverse microbial community capable of degrading azo dyes under extreme environmental conditions. In this study, thirteen bacterial strains capable of degrading eight azo dyes were isolated in nearshore environments and characterized using high throughput 16 S rRNA sequencing. The results of this study demonstrate that the biodegradability of azo dyes was influenced by their chemical structure and position of functional groups as well as the type of bacteria. The decolorization rate of Methyl Orange (95%) was double that of the heavier and sterically hindered Reactive Yellow 84 (<40%). Shewanella indica strain ST2, Oceanimonas smirnovii strain ST3, Enterococcus faecalis strain ST5, and Clostridium bufermentans strain ST12 demonstrated potential application in industrial effluent treatment as they were tolerant to a wide range of environmental parameters (pH: 5–9, NaCl: 0–70 g L−1, azo dye concentration: 100–2000 mg L−1) including exposure to metals. Analysis of the transformation products using GC-MS revealed that different bacterial strains may have different biotransformation pathways. This study provides critical insight on the in-situ biotransformation potential of azo dyes in marine environments.

Original languageEnglish
Article number110222
JournalJournal of Environmental Management
Volume261
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 May 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Azo dye-degrading bacteria
  • Azo reductase
  • Biodegradation
  • High throughput sequencing
  • Nearshore sediment

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