A review of material development in the field of carbon capture and the application of membrane-based processes in power plants and energy-intensive industries

Xuezhong He*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

This review highlights recent developments and future perspectives on CO2 capture from power plants and energy-intensive industries to reduce CO2 emissions. Different types of membrane materials for CO2 capture were reviewed in terms of material performance, energy efficiency, and cost. With regard to gas separation membrane technology, only three types of membranes have been demonstrated at pilot scale. Therefore, this work paid particular attention to recent development of membrane materials such as fixed-site-carrier membranes and ultrathin nanocomposite membranes. The required high-performance membranes with CO2 permeance of 3m3(STP)/(m2hbar) and high CO2/N2 selectivity (>40) were identified as the future direction of material development. Moreover, novel energy-efficient process development for CO2 capture in power plant and process industry are discussed; the MTR patented air sweeping process is considered one of the most energy-efficient processes for post-combustion CO2 capture. In the last part, CO2/CH4 selectivity of >30 was pointed out to be the requirement of energy-efficient membrane system for CO2 removal from natural gas and biogas. Finally, significant improvements on membrane material performance, module, and process efficiency are still needed for membrane technology to be competitive in CO2 capture.

Original languageEnglish
Article number34
JournalEnergy, Sustainability and Society
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Nov 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Biogas
  • CO capture
  • Flue gas
  • Membrane
  • Natural gas
  • Post-combustion

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'A review of material development in the field of carbon capture and the application of membrane-based processes in power plants and energy-intensive industries'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this