A buckled membrane sensor for in situ mechanical and microstructure analysis of li-ion battery electrodes

H. Jung, C. F. Lin, K. Gerasopoulos, G. Rubloff, R. Ghodssi

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

This work presents the first demonstration of a buckled membrane sensor for in situ, simultaneous characterization of stress and microstructure evolutions in a vanadium pentoxide (V2O5) lithium-ion battery (LIB) cathode during battery operation. The buckled membrane is coated with V2O5 on the backside and enables atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy from the topside. Using dual-mode measurements, both the induced stress and Raman intensity changes due to lithium cycling are observed. Results are in good agreement with the expected mechanical behavior and disorder change in a V2O5 electrode, highlighting the potential of MEMS as enabling tools for advanced scientific investigations.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2015 Transducers - 2015 18th International Conference on Solid-State Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems, TRANSDUCERS 2015
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
Pages1953-1956
Number of pages4
ISBN (Electronic)9781479989553
DOIs
StatePublished - 5 Aug 2015
Externally publishedYes
Event18th International Conference on Solid-State Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems, TRANSDUCERS 2015 - Anchorage, United States
Duration: 21 Jun 201525 Jun 2015

Publication series

Name2015 Transducers - 2015 18th International Conference on Solid-State Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems, TRANSDUCERS 2015

Conference

Conference18th International Conference on Solid-State Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems, TRANSDUCERS 2015
CountryUnited States
CityAnchorage
Period21/06/1525/06/15

Keywords

  • AFM
  • In situ
  • lithium-ion battery
  • microstructure
  • Raman spectroscopy
  • stress

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